The wonderings and wanderings of Dakin and Company

Category: Words

This is a random collection of essays, columns and short stories, drawn mostly from life and the crazy stuff that happens in it.

[Article I wrote to promote Kinfundi.] Getting back into the swing of things after the December holidays is always a bit of a challenge. Even more so for those who are unsure of their financial stability or how they’re going to afford the new expenses of the new year. Kinfundi is a way to alleviate some of that strain. Employers now have the power to send their employees and their relatives back to school. Kinfundi is a new type of employee fringe benefit that bosses can offer to their staff to help them save for future tuition fees for their families. In a country such as South Africa, with increasing income inequality and stagnant upward mobility, it is important that every person and business that can, offer their staff helping hands where they need it most. And with the cost of education increasing at nearly double the rate of inflation,...
[A post I wrote for SoulSeekers] In the last moments before our annual sunset, I can’t help myself but sit in the warm glow of dusk and reflect on what’s been. Numerologically, 2017 was the first year of a new cycle. It broke anew from the rough — and for many, painful, torturous — end-of-cycle that was 2016. It was like that for me; a rebirth on so many fronts and in a lot of wonderful ways. 2018 is going to be the year of living each day for that day’s sake. This is not necessarily in the numbers, but it is in my heart and in my resolve. That means I’m going to untether myself from all of the lovely things I’ve just finished gathering, raise my eyes to the horizon and walk, as bold-footed as I’m able, towards the next thing. I feel like I’ve always speed-dated my...
[Press Release I wrote for Stellenbosch Brewery]   Media Release September 2017   Stellenbosch Brewing Company’s Honderhok Bock is this year’s winner of the South African National Beer Trophy Competition. In addition to winning the coveted Beer of the Year award, the same brew also won a Gold medal and the trophy for Best Beer in the Amber Category. Their Stellies Mass Hoppiness IPA won a silver medal. These stunning victories were achieved in a very competitive field: 199 beers entered the competition from 64 breweries in six provinces. The victory was even more profound because Stellies beat other, more established brewers like Devil’s Peak, CBC, Darling Brew and Mitchell’s. And it was only their second year of partaking in the competition. “This is an amazing achievement,” said Bruce Collins, Founder and Master Brewer of Stellenbosch Brewing Company. “It still feels completely surreal. I’ve always believed in our products but...
[Blog entry written for NananTravel] Luxury trains redefine excellence and adventure There’s a soft knock on the door of your cabin. You’re gently pulled out of your smiling dreamland into the morning sunlight. You roll over on your plush mattress, the thick cotton sheets wrapping softly around your rested body, and lift your cheek off the fluffy pillows. “Come in,” you whisper loudly. A smiling attendant slides your door open, carrying a tray with a steaming coffee plunger, two coffee cups and an assortment of baked goodies. The sharp, sweet smell of the freshly roasted coffee delights your senses as you welcome the new day. Outside the landscape is flashing by in bright greens and blues and yellows. You get excited about the new places you’re going to discover today as you pour yourself and your lover/spouse/partner/friend a welcome cup of morning brew. Where are you? The answer is simple....
[Personal essay] My mom is a person of perfection. She is elegant and tall and made from obedience. She is also made to be obeyed. Throughout my primary school-years she insisted on piano lessons, extra-mural activities and academic achievement. In the shadow of her pointed finger and clanking gold bangles I spent half-an-hour before school practicing my scales and every weekday afternoon struggling to perfect things like chess and hurdles and my twelve times table. Then things shifted: One ordinary afternoon her car revved up our farm’s driveway and brought with it its usual fume of panic and “have-I-done-all-my-chores?” But when she pulled open the glass sliding door and stepped into the kitchen, I knew that today the first question wouldn’t be, “Is all your homework done?” Something significant had happened. Her eyes were alive in a new way; not tired or frustrated from the daily rub of farming and...
[Article I wrote to promote Kinfundi] It is annual bonus time but with the current state of economic affairs in South Africa, some companies might not have performed as well as they’d hoped. This does not mean that employees have not been working extremely hard, and now it is possible to reward them in a very unique way. Education means liberation. And the current education crisis has put a big spotlight on education affordability. The fact remains that South Africa’s economy is not strong enough to offer free education and therefore the onus falls on parents, who more often than not cannot afford tertiary education for their children. As a bonus to employees, companies can join Kinfundi, invest a small amount into this education savings benefit and continue with monthly contributions as part of their employee benefits offering.  Kinfundi is a new type of fringe benefit that employers can offer...
Kinfundi decided to launch a social media campaign to highlight the women behind their education savings product. I interviewed these amazing individuals, shot the footage and edited them into these clips. I also created teaser clips for Instagram. Here are the five women and their stories: This is the story of Nosi Memani, the person who planted the idea that started Kinfundi. We call her Kinfundi's First Lady.  Katrien is the Digital and PR Manager at Kinfundi. She had some very poignant things to say about privilege, before it became such a hot-button word. Nosiphiwo is a shareholder in the company bringing Kinfundi to market. Her perspectives as someone who lived in exile and whose family came back to South Africa to build it up again, were vital experiences to hear about. Samantha heads up operations at Kinfundi's head office. As a mom herself, education is a primary concern....
[My imagining of what it was like on 16 June 1976] You lift your cheek off the brown, salty ground. You try to look over your arm, try to see through the dust. Why is everybody running? Why are you lying on your stomach with a mouth full of soil? It feels like you’ve been pulled through a dreamless sleep that lasted for less than a second and longer than a day. Everything is confusing. One long, dark heartbeat ago you were holding hands with your classmates, marching peacefully, singing a song. Teboho was carrying a poster that said, “Down with Afrikaans.” Hector’s poster proudly stated, “I will not be taught in the language of the oppressor.” Before that, you were all finishing a mathematics exam. For many long minutes you sat in that small, freezing brick classroom with its zinc roof and bare concrete floor. Sixty-four matric pupils folded...
[Some deep thoughts about marriage] It doesn’t happen when you’d expect it to. Not in the burst of celebration and the pomp of ceremony. Not in the perfectly planned I-dos, nor in the afterglow of two glorious honeymoons. It doesn’t happen when you want it to, pretending not to wish it here. Calmly and then less calmly trying to summon that invisible cable to connect us, for all the world to see. It doesn’t happen in the raw rub of disappointment or the itch of unmet expectations, even though that’s when I hope it would kick in the strongest. And so I resign myself to accepting that it is either a gradual awakening—the kind where forty years later, sitting on a stoep together, laughing, I finally see it, feel it and realise that it’s been there for some time. Or it is never there—the lie underneath the fairy tale of...
[Chapter 1 of my memoir] It is always brown somewhere in South Africa. During the frostbitten winter, it’s the flat Highveld that cracks and curls up in chocolate squares of parched soil. These gold- and diamond- and crop-littered plains get their rain in the summer, sometimes in abundance, sometimes not. In the winter that wetness becomes a forgotten fantasy that is swept away in howling dust storms and hearsay. The June air fills with static, the tall grasses splinter, the sky becomes a lighter blue and sunlight is thinner. Dryness envelops the meadows and fields. The earth below loses all its moisture. The land above cracks and curls and parches. In the Highveld winters, the deepest hardness of Africa is seen and felt in its brittle brown ground. In the searing summer months, it is the fringe of land along the coast—the southern curve of Africa—that tans a deep cocoa...
[One way of being introduced to Africa:] We are the land. We are Africa. We are made from the ancestral spirits of the San and the Khoikhoi and the Bantu peoples. We are not the god of everybody but are the beginning of everything. Many people have sought our counsel in the wind or in bones or in the healing wise whispers of those who passed before them. Ours is the domain that stretches across from ocean to ocean and from the great desert above to the stormy coastline below. We have been here since the beginning. We have raised mountains by folding great depths of rock over each other. We have grown forests and greened valleys. Along us rivers stream down to the sea and carve canyons out of the stone, sand and soil. And we offer their waters to the sky so that it may rain back down...
[I get my story-telling from my dad. These are his words, my interviewing] I was sitting at home one night and a friend of ours—a Pom, working at Blue Circle cement factory—phoned me and said “Dorrian, I’m in big trouble. This dog arrived on our doorstep in town and we made the huge mistake of giving him some food. Now the dog refuses to leave. My wife’s gone to Johannesburg and she said that if the dog’s still here when she gets back, she’s moving into the hotel.”  And he asked “Can’t you take the dog. He is a St Bernard, but he must be a brak because he has short hair.” So I said “Ja, bring him. We need a big dog.” On the way out to the farm he put the dog in the back of the car—an old Ford Escort—and the dog chewed, bit a big piece...
[Personal Essay] I am stuck in the birth canal, inside my mother. All that Doctor Kaizer can see is a tiny patch of my head; pink and blonde. Everything else is swollen folds of red skin stretched into circles and covered in blood, mucus, discharge, remnants of broken water. My tiny eyes are still shut. Forced shut by being pressed up against the walls of the tunnel everyone is trying to get me out of. So I don’t see the “vanity screens” wheeled around my mother in the labor room, with faded lime cloth scrunched onto the upper and lower rods of a shiny silver frame. Or the hospital-issue, light blue sheet tented over her lower body, her legs stirruped in icy metal holds. Don’t see the white-uniformed nurse handing polished steel tools to the doctor. Or the steel kidney bowl that holds these scalpels, surgical scissors and the glossy...
[Personal Story] Tina Turner blasts through speakers that aren’t supposed to be played at their maximum. The deejay sips a fresh, satisfying brandy and coke. He surveys the crowd, smiling, ignoring the cracks and tears pounding out of his tripodded black boxes. You’re simply the best. Better than a--ll the rest. The song is rolling down from one of its crescendos. Many of the folks on the dance floor are howling along with the lyrics, some half a note behind but not caring to catch up. Mom and Dad are facing each other, slightly apart from the cacophony. Every now and again, though, they’ll look over at the mass of arms and legs and bobbing heads, and smile. She’s dancing the way she always dances: shoulders straight, body moving side-to-side, feet taking turns tapping neatly behind the heel of the other. Her arms swing gently to the beat, elbows stiff...
[Personal Essay] Once upon a time there was a farm in the southern round of Africa. This farm lay in a dusty stretch that became known as the Platteland because of its flat horizon. At first this region was overlooked by settlers and pioneers—Voortrekkers—because it didn’t have a bustling port or a roaring river or the promise of gold. It was inland, plain, boring. Eventually, though, government officials of the Zuid Afrikaansche Republiek drew lines across hand-sketched maps and sliced the land into sellable pieces. Then weary representatives reluctantly traveled from Pretoria and spiked a number of sharp metal stakes into the soil. It took them five days on horseback to get there. They carved out farms from the endless savannah and christened them with names like Graslaagte and Zoetmelkvallei and Rietfontein¹. During the frequent droughts that swept the region, these names became airless jokes. During wet years, however, the farms bloomed...
[Critical Essay and Op-Ed piece] The final judgment in Roe v Wade was handed down nearly four years after “Jane Roe” fell pregnant. The African-American Civil Rights Movement spent fourteen very active and costly years fighting for equal and fair treatment. Legislation preventing the next Matthew Shepard hate crime and ensuring equal pay to future Lilly Ledbetters took eleven years to get passed. Sixteen years after the Defense Of Marriage Act first became law we are finally seeing its undoing and the release of a new wave of liberties and equalities, but even after all that time it’s still not fully decided or undone.   All of these advances in human rights and human dignity took a long time and much sacrifice. And there is still a lot that needs to be done. That’s why it is so surprising to me that “this is an election about the economy.” Bull Shit. There is...
But last week was so pretty, so warm, so sunny, I think to myself as I look around with despair at the tar-bottomed rivers that follow cars to intersections and flow over each other to swirl and twirl through the bars of the storm drains. My umbrella is shredded by the wind and my shoes are squeakingly acknowledging that they are waterlogged, as I miss busses and dodge cars to get to a certain room, in a specific hall, by a fixed time. Today is the first day of classes and, partly due to the relentless rainstorm, it feels like a world away from the sunny shining of campus during the post-Irene bliss of registration week. I am running to class, late. And then I will run from class to a conference call for a summer job whose leftovers are spilling into my semester and whose deliverables, though once as tasty and exciting as my...
There are drums. In the distance. The beats join the music in a happy union. I can sense smiling. And a twirl of tulle-ed skirts and can-can costumes. I walk closer, unable to keep myself away. Someone takes my bicycle from me. “Don’t worry, it's safe here.” The tarred road quickly becomes gravel as I walk further off today's route. That's okay. It is safe here. The music gets louder and as I round a corner; a red flash. Then more red, and a torso. First just smiling and shaking and rhythmically undulating. Then a louder flash of music. And the drums again. Always the drums as I walk into what feels like an African tribal ritual of stomps and starts. I walk through the beat. People start writhing around me. More red. Beautiful red that makes me smile. Smile because everything red is a dress and only some of...